takuriverfloods
Taku Flood 2004  Taku Flood 2007 Taku Flood 2009 Taku Flood 2014

 

TAKURIVER.COM

2004

GEESBROOKS CABIN FLOATED 5 MILES DOWN RIVER

TO LAND IN OUR FRONT YARD DURING THE LARGEST

FLOOD IN 50 YEARS.


 

1) 45.07 ft on 06/25/2004
2) 44.19 ft on 07/22/2007
3) 44.13 ft on 08/17/1989
4) 43.88 ft on 07/30/1994
5) 43.77 ft on 07/26/2000
6) 43.23 ft on 07/26/1995
7) 42.89 ft on 07/28/1993
8) 42.46 ft on 08/20/1992
9) 42.34 ft on 06/30/2005
10) 42.21 ft on 09/02/2006
11) 42.10 ft on 07/20/1990
12) 41.99 ft on 08/17/2002
13) 41.85 ft on 08/10/2001
14) 41.82 ft on 07/27/1997
15) 41.77 ft on 08/02/1998
16) 41.68 ft on 08/01/1988
17) 41.57 ft on 08/20/1999
18) 40.96 ft on 08/27/1987
19) 40.95 ft on 08/11/2003
20) 40.90 ft on 09/01/1991
21) 40.52 ft on 09/19/1996

TAKU RIVER FLOOD

                 Tulsequah Lake is at about 1,140          
feet above sea level on the north side
of Devils Paw Mountain. The lake is
impounded by a distributary branch of
Tulsequah Glacier and is about 20
miles upstream from the mouth of the
Tulsequah River, a major tributary to
the Taku River. The U.S. Geological
Survey (USGS) has operated a
streamflow-gaging station on the

Taku River (station No. 15041200)
since 1987. Outburst floods from Tulsequah
Lake have occurred frequently and
have been documented by Marcus
(1960), Miller (1963), Post and Mayo
(1971), and the USGS (1988-99).

Tulsequah Lake is filled during
the summer months by rainfall and
by glacial melt. As Tulsequah Lake
fills, the lake surface rises until the
hydrostatic pressure at the base of the
ice dam causes the ice to float. As this
occurs, water begins flowing near the

base of the glacier. This flowing water
thermally erodes the dam, progressively
enlarging the opening. At
Tulsequah Lake, no surface drainage
is evident, and all discharge appears to
be through a subglacial tunnel. Data
from documented outburst floods
indicate that the flow of the Taku
River generally doubles or triples during

a 2- to 3-day period.